HotFix: How to Get Bug Fixes in WordPress Before the Next Core Update


HotFix: How to Get Bug Fixes in WordPress Before the Next Core Update
Lance Watson

Overtime, WordPress has become a very large project powering millions of websites. We have people complaining all the time, why does WordPress have so many updates like WordPress 3.4.2 etc. The truth is, it does not have enough updates. Even with all the beta testing on various environments, there is always a slight possibility that the core team may miss a bug or two. While that bug may not affect everyone, but it does affect some. In this article, we will show you how to get bug fixes in WordPress before the next core update using a plugin called HotFix.

How to Get Bug Fixes in WordPress Before the Next Core Update
Homer Mitchell

WordPress has grown to a very large project powering many websites. With all of the updates that come out it is sometimes still not enough and require a fix for your issue before the next update. In this video, we will show you how to get bug fixes in WordPress before the next core update.

WordPress.org
Brandy Gill

This unofficial plugin provides fixes for selected WordPress bugs, so you don’t have to wait for the next WordPress core release. This does not mean you can stop updating WordPress! It just means that you’ll get a few selected fixes more quickly.

Hotfix
Roman Myers

The term “hotfix” originally referred to software patches that were applied to “hot” systems; that is, systems which are live, currently running, and in production status rather than development status. For the developer, a hotfix implies that the change may have been made quickly and outside normal development and testing processes. This could increase the cost of the fix by requiring rapid development, overtime or other urgent measures. For the user, the hotfix could be considered riskier or less likely to resolve the problem. This could cause an immediate loss of services, so depending on the severity of the bug, it may be desirable to delay a hotfix. The risk of applying the hotfix must be weighed against the risk of not applying it, because the problem to be fixed might be so critical that it could be considered more important than a potential loss of service (e.g., a major security breach).

Be the first to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.


*